Welcome to the Treehouse Podcast! In each episode we’ll dig into the world around us, exploring how creativity and imagination drive discovery and innovation. Meet the experts and innovators redefining how we see our world, express ourselves, and challenge what we think we know about the world around us.   

In this episode: 

What is slow looking, and how can we use this tool to think like a geographer? Join host, educator and award-winning storyteller Wesley Della Volla and guest Peg Keiner as they discuss slow thinking, community engagement and that time she stumbled on a cactus in the woods.  

Peg Keiner is the director of innovation at GEMS World Academy Chicago, creating spaces for people to solve the problems that matter to them. She empowers communities by helping them use technology to express themselves, collect data, and drive positive action. Keiner is a National Geographic-Lindblad Expeditions Grosvenor Teacher Fellow, National Geographic Education Fellow, Apple Distinguished Educator, Google Earth Education Expert, and Global Goal Ambassador for the United Nations Association Chicago Chapter. She is also the host of the podcast Thriving on the Possibility. 

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Comments

  • That Reminds me of Puerto Rico, like Florida it has a hurricane season, but is an island, so there no way to run.  I been there on hurricanes, and nature is amazing and scary at the same time.

  • This situation brings back memories of the science hackathons we organize in school. It's fascinating to consider what we can glean from nature or artifacts to better understand our world. For instance, when we examine tree rings, what valuable insights and inferences can we draw solely from this natural record?

  • This situation brings back memories of the science hackathons we organize in school. It's fascinating to consider what we can glean from nature or artifacts to better understand our world. For instance, when we examine tree rings, what valuable insights and inferences can we draw solely from this natural record?

  • Close Looking is an intriguing way to promote engagement with nature!

  • How Much you can get out of one hour of relaxations.

  • Thank you for sharing Peg! Loved the stories! Using technology is a great and powerful tool to express yourself, especially in an increasingly internet-facing environment! 

  • I really liked to climb trees as a kid.  Unfortunately no treehouse though.  lol    The world around us is what keeps us alive, and comfortable.  Shade from trees, CO2 >>> O2 moderates the climate and lets us breathe...  Trees and plants are a good thing...  Now missing in cities and urban environments...

  • That is a good advise when you travel, Because you never going to know if you ever come back to that location, so take thins in.

  • Great podcast! It's all in the way our perception sees and remembers things. Everything in nature needs to be appreciated!

  • Good podcast. Thanks.